8 required fields for pet food labels

On this blog, we've discussed a study that showed pet food labels are often misleading. While those researchers at Chapman University might have encouraged pet owners to be cautious about their purchasing habits, where does that leave pet food makers?

In the last decade, specialty pet food has become a major trend. From dog biscuit bakeries to the finest selection of canned cat food, animal lovers have seen the market flush with options for the gourmet critters in their lives. Big companies have jumped on the bandwagon, but small specialty brands have also emerged as leaders in premium canine and feline delicacies. As a result, individuals hoping to break into that lucrative market might wonder what's required of labeling for products. Here's what the Food and Drug Administration requires:

  1. Brand and Product Name.
  2. Name of Species for which the pet food is intended. Generic "pet biscuits" won't fly unless a company specifies what type of animal should eat the food. 
  3. Quantity Statement. Manufacturers must list the mass of the products. 
  4. Guaranteed Analysis. This is a breakdown of the nutritional information. 
  5. Ingredient Statement. Here, makers must list the components of the food. 
  6. Nutritional Adequacy Statement. Indicate the size, stage of life, and other considerations owners should make like how frequently a pet should consume the food. 
  7. Feeding Directions. These are instructions for portion control and suggested use. 
  8. Name and address of manufacturer or distributor.

Following these guidelines will ensure the proper use of pet foods, keeping customers informed and satisfied. To stay on top of accurate, thorough labeling, companies should explore custom label printing options and industrial label printers. By doing the work in-house, canine culinary superstars can reduce third party costs and update labels as often as necessary. 

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