Are Pet Food Labels Clear Enough for Consumers?

Pet owners want their furry friends to eat food that is packed with essential vitamins and other nutrients. But many of the nutritional labels on pet food are not designed with the average consumer in mind. The language can be highly technical, making it difficult for buyers to understand exactly what they are getting. 

This is important, because recent studies have shown that pet foods may not contain the correct nutritional balances that animal experts recommend. For instance, researchers at Tufts University analyzed 45 brands of cat food and found that 13 percent of them did not contain enough Vitamin B1 to meet minimum requirements. This could pose a potential health risk to cats over the long term.

The Association of American Feed Control Officials, a pet food oversight body, is forming a working group that will explore options to update pet food labeling rules. This news was applauded by many pet food manufacturers. The Pet Food Institute, which represents makers of dog and cat food, said that new rules could result in more "plain language" on labels.

"Today, pet food makers and regulators alike are bound by decades-old state and federal labeling requirements that confuse rather than inform U.S. pet food buyers," the PFI said in a statement. "PFI, and its members, who make 98 percent of all U.S. dog and cat food products sold in the United States, support modern pet food labeling and use of ingredient nomenclature that is consumer-friendly and meaningful."

Pet food manufacturers need to label their products in ways that consumers will understand. With an industrial label printer, companies can make adjustments to their custom label printing that reflect trends and brand identity. Contact us today to learn more about how printing labels in-house can save your business time and money.

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