Chemical Safety Act could re-categorize known dangerous substances

It can be enough of a struggle for major producers who have finally obtained agricultural chemical labels for their product to make them accurate with current regulations, but what happens when those regulations change? It could happen more spontaneously than you might think, and companies should be prepared to update their labels based on what classifications materials have at any given moment.

For example, a current piece of legislation in the works could change things for producers should it become enacted. Known as the "Chemical Safety Improvement Act," it was introduced earlier this year and claims to be focused on identifying potential risks in various chemicals that could reach consumers and potentially cause harm. It also calls for the development of testing to evaluate these potential dangers. 

However, there appears to be some opposition to these measures. The L. A. Times, in its editorial on the Act, notes that the majority of industrial substances are not currently tested, and that with this act the Environmental Protection Agency could theoretically prevent individual states from determining these negative effects for themselves under their laws. 

"The Chemical Safety Improvement Act should not be approved unless it is revised to improve existing safeguards, or at the very least not weaken them," the editors of the Times write.

Regardless of how this particular example ends up, it's important for any company that manages or manufacturers potentially dangerous elements to fully understand what regulations apply, and create custom industrial labels that fully comply. To do this, a company can look for label-making systems that reduce the amount of time and resources it takes to create proper identification.

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