Giving your ‘chemicals’ the right representation

Is the word "chemical" inherently bad news?

Some chemicals just get a bad rap. It might be deserved, and this doesn't mean safety should be ignored, but there needs to be some sort of clarity to the people who will be using your products in order to make sure there's no abuse.

All the same, a recent opinion piece published by Mark Lorch on BBC News brings up a valid point on the stigma that the mere category might carry. This is why the chemicals your business prints need to be tied to reality and specifically describe the important details about these chemicals and why they require specific behavior in handling.

There needs to be more that accompanies your products that makes sure you skip scaring handlers and go straight to proper use.

"The very word chemical is often synonymous with toxin or poison. We use phrases like 'it's chock-full of chemicals' to imply something is artificial and bad for you," Lorch writes. "Meaningless slogans like "chemical-free" pop up on products in health food stores and billboards."

Even with the knowledge that comes from working in the industry, the handlers of chemicals might seem a little ill-prepared to really respond to the issues contained. Your chemical labels can do this in language that you've researched and know is clear.

For example, the case brought up in a recent Wall Street Journal article about laundry detergent being consumed by children, the specific toxic ingredients could have been listed to give parents a little more information.

In any case, it should be clear that specificity is the key, and when you pursue custom industrial labels, you can make sure the finished product describes this in detail, so you avoid simply scaring anyone on the other end.

Leave a Comment