Pesticides in food: What can your company do?

Food and wine labels have a lot of explaining they need to do to meet the customer demand for transparency these days, but in addition to the intentional ingredients and additives, unexplained residues can creep in, and the producers and manufacturers should treat this threat of contamination seriously. It may not even be in a harmful amount, but you can bet that its presence will still garner attention if it's discovered.

There's a Bloomberg article from earlier this month that discussed a recent examination of several different kinds of wine from France. More than 1,680 milligrams of this kind of chemical were found in one bottle in particular from Bordeaux, but they all had some level, and this might have something to do with the fact that Europe, as the source reports, does not regulate this area enough, although some of the chemicals discovered were outlawed.

While vintners and other winemakers can use their wine labels to inform consumers of the use of pesticides, pesticide producers can, alternately, include detailed instructions as to the way to distribute their chemicals so as to avoid the possibility of contamination.

Vegetables and Fruits

Pesticide producers also need to remember the importance of instructions when it comes to foods that will go straight to the consumer. Another story, this from KTVU in California, reported that more than a third of vegetables and fruit in the state go to market with pesticide remnants on them. It quoted a member of the Pesticide Action Network on the proliferation of use that these chemicals have been seeing.

"We are still using over a billion pounds of pesticides a year in this country," the Network representative Kristen Schafer said. "It's too much and it's not a problem that we cannot shop our way out of." 

Apparently this group tests food regularly at a lab they run, and has found more than 80 percent of one recent sample had some pesticide content. These may be consumer-facing statistics, but they could dearly affect the way your product and the companies you do business with are perceived. 

It shouldn't have to be a matter of forcing consumers to change their preferences. Your pesticides can be handled and distributed in a way that meets health standards and won't drive consumers away in shock if they are discovered.

Loud and Clear

Labeling can come to the rescue for farmers, manufacturers, producers, and, in the end, consumers. Everybody can get what they want through the use of displays that clearly communicate the things that people on each step of the production and distribution process need to know.

Here are just a few different applications of high-speed, universal color labeling:

  • More complexity: If a certain label requires color or an image of some sort, you can trust an industry standard label provider to generate the right label with the right effect.
  • Customization: You can select the size and shape of labels so as to both meet regulatory standards and get a neat, uniform effect when whatever product is being labeled goes out for shipping.
  • Putting the process in perspective: Because you can design these labels and include important information, you may also consider additional descriptions and precautions, such as detailed information on the effects of pesticides on exposed human skin and the way that certain amounts of use might impact the crops being sprayed.

Other ways that labeling can be put to good use in your production system may be discovered as you begin the process for yourself. Once your company is armed with the right color labeling equipment, however, you may find ideas for keeping these pesticide labels and other chemical information displays current will suggest themselves naturally the more you produce.

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