Chemical labels are beneficial, especially in the shipping process so all employees understand how to safely handle various materials.

Semi truck collision underlines need for chemical labels

Hazardous chemicals can be dangerous to any individual involved in their manufacturing, distribution and transport. With this in mind, businesses that handle potentially harmful materials on a daily basis are well-advised to ensure that all products have current chemical labels. Not only can companies face federal fines for not adhering to GHS labeling standards, but unmarked materials could force an even longer clean up process should any accidents occur.

For example, last week in Western Minnesota, a semi truck transporting anhydrous ammonia collided with train. According to CBS News, early Tuesday morning, the train's engine hit the tanker and forced it off the road and created a leak. The state transportation department kept a section of U.S. 12 highway closed as crews conducted cleanup.

Residents within a 2-mile radius were asked to avoid the area and a nearby elementary school evacuated students and moved them to a different location for the remainder of the day. Four individuals were taken to area hospitals, including the semi truck driver. Three were treated and released while the driver remained in critical condition. The Associated Press reported that he died almost one week later.

In this situation, authorities were able to immediately call in the proper teams to safely clean up and dispose of the hazardous materials. However, had the chemicals been stored in unlabeled containers, it could have been much more difficult to contain the situation.

By investing in an Epson GP-C831 label printer, manufacturing companies can guarantee that all of their items – especially hazardous ones – have legible and durable labels. That way, throughout the entire transportation and distribution process, individuals understand how to handle the containers safely.

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