What a bottled water label says to consumers

As a toxic algae bloom in Toledo, Ohio, has many consumers eyeing their tap water suspiciously, demand for bottled water has grown. A simple trip down a grocery store aisle will present scores of options, with a wide range of prices as the packaging labels of each product uses different strategies to attract consumers.

Some labels advertise unique wellness properties of the spring the water is bottled from, while others employ terms such as "artesian" or "reverse osmosis filtered" to stand out from the competition. But as Consumer Reports explains, nearly half of the bottled water sold in the United States is ordinary filtered tap water.

When considering label design strategies for bottled water, it is possible to learn from some of the mistakes and successes of established brands.

For example, both Dasani and Aquafina are among the best selling water brands, but neither can boast any special spring or source, as both are simply tap water from local water sources that has been treated. The success of these brands can be attributed to their colorful, eye-catching blue labels that consumers associate with purity and refreshment. 

There is no law that forces bottled water producers to identify their source, so the majority simply don't. But if you do choose to use the source of the water as selling point, be sure to take a lesson from Poland Springs. A 2002 lawsuit alleged that the actual Poland Spring in Maine had gone dry as early as 1967, causing the company to settle out of court for an undisclosed sum.

Whatever strategy you pursue, it is important to ensure that the label is both water-proof and durable. Few things can negatively impact consumer perception like a worn or water-damaged label. Fortunately, DuraFast offers a range of color label printers and printing equipment to help your bottled water stand out on the shelves. 

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