CVS to enhance large-print labeling for customers

Drugstores have come a long way in providing solutions for customers with limited mobility, vision and other impairments that make collecting and administering prescriptions a challenge. One of the key areas where large chains and small storefronts alike have found success is redesigning labels to be more user-friendly for the elderly. 

This month, CVS announced that it would rely on creative labeling to enhance user experiences in its ScripAbility prescription accessibility system, created to assist customers who are blind or visually impaired. In addition to providing Braille labels for customers with total blindness, users who have trouble reading small print will be able to order prescriptions with large fonts for improved clarity. 

"Ensuring all of our members have access to important information about their prescriptions is in keeping with our purpose of helping people on their path to better health," said Jon Roberts, president of CVS. 

In the pharmaceutical delivery industry, clarity and readability are paramount to ensuring proper use of prescriptions. Extending accessibility-focused options to people with impaired vision can help them better manage other health conditions, particularly among elderly patients. According to the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists, the average American between 65 and 69 takes 14 prescription medications annually, while those between 80 and 84 take 18 on average. 

While pharmacy giants have the resources and bandwidth to enhance these services on a large scale, small businesses can follow suit with custom label printing. Whether a company offers prescriptions on a delivery or in-store basis, customers can stay informed about indications, prescribed doses and side effects with easy-to-read labels. Investing in user-friendliness with an industrial label printer can provide better service that keeps customers healthy and in the know. 

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