Are whiskey bottles being labeled accurately?

Whiskey lovers used to only had a few major brands to choose from. But, just as with so many other industries, craft production has changed everything. 

Just over a decade ago, the United States only had 50 small craft distilleries. Today, the American Craft Spirits Association claims that there more than 800. Liquor stores aren't just stocked with bottles of Jim Beam and Jack Daniels anymore. For drinkers, there is a wealth of choices.

"Many distilleries sell bottles that do not contain their own whiskey."

But while many consumers may prefer small-batch, artisanal whiskeys over their macro-distilled counterparts, how can they be sure that they are getting what they pay for? This is a particularly relevant question, given that the entire industry may be heading for a serious shortage.

Good whiskey takes time to make, and some new distillers are cutting corners to get their product to market. What you see on the bottle's label may not be what you get.

As pointed out by an article on Eater, many distilleries sell bottles that do not contain their own whiskey, but rather whiskey purchased from large producers. This practice is known as "sourcing," and it's a way for new distilleries to get their name out there and earn revenue while they wait for that 10-year-old single barrel to finish aging. 

It's a fairly common practice, and one that most distilleries will admit to when asked. However, few, if any, bottles are labeled in such a way that clearly indicates the source of the whiskey within. For buyers who are serious about their drink, this can be a problem.

Consumers are going to respect brands that they know they can trust. Being open and honest with people about a specific product requires clear labeling. At DuraFast, we carry a wide selection of printers and printing supplies to help your labels stand out. Contact us today!

Leave a Comment