BPA-Free Labels May Not Tell The Whole Story

Many plastic containers – such as water bottles and canned food liners – contain a chemical called Bisphenol-A, or BPA. It's a highly controversial chemical. Though both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Food Safety Authority say that it is safe for food packaging, many studies suggest negative effect. High exposure may impact the liver and kidneys, as well as the reproductive system.

"Chemicals that have replaced BPA may have their own problems."

These potential risks have caused many consumers to prefer BPA-free products. It is fairly common to see plastic containers with a "BPA-free" label. However, some have questioned whether this is necessarily safer. That's because, as a recent article on The Conversation points out, chemicals that have replaced BPA may have their own problems.

One such BPA substitute is polyethylene terephthalate, or PET. While it has not been studied as extensively as BPA, there is some evidence that PET can be an endocrine disruptor , according to the National Institutes of Health. And yet, products containing "BPA-free" labels rarely indicate what sort of replacement chemicals are contained within. This can lead to consumer confusion. One study found that people still preferred products labeled "BPA-free," even after being told that the potential replacements might be more dangerous.

Safety labels cannot be effective if consumers are not made aware of all of the factors that they should be considering when they make their purchase decisions. It is important for product manufacturers to be more transparent in their labeling, and provide the consumer with information about all of the chemicals contained within. They can do this by creating custom labels. At DuraFast, we carry a wide selection of printers and printing supplies to help your labels stand out. Contact us today!

Leave a Comment