Could a lack of proper handling instructions lead to destruction?

There are some things that might seem obvious to handlers of fancy vintage beverages like Champagne, but labels still need to be as blatant as possible to avoid misconceptions that might lead to danger.

That can be seen in a recent occurrence from December, where an Italian businessman who was only trying to open up a celebratory bottle of "spumante" accidentally ruined a large 18th-century painting.

The Telegraph reports that the man in question, Roberto Cassago, was toasting a Milan Christmas party when the cork of the wine he was opening rocketed through a classic artwork that happened to be in the "line of fire" in the council room.

Although Cassago has reported that he will cover whatever the insurance money doesn't, the act still seems to have been one of some embarrassment, especially since it might very well be part of his legacy among work friends, seeing as he will be leaving his company soon.

"This time I'll get someone else to open the bottle," he said, referring to his retirement party. 

Though there's no accounting for human error, wine labels must have the proper advisories to users on how to hold and open them so as to avoid catastrophe.

Although the damage to the painting was unfortunate, this situation could have easily been much worse had the cork been aimed at a human being or another potentially dangerous place.

Ultimately, wine companies should feel the pressure to make color labels that walk customers through everything they could possibly do wrong when handling their beverages.

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