Vermont attorney general drafts GMO labeling guidelines

Vermont, the first state in the nation to pass a genetically modified organism (GMO) labeling bill without provisions that keep the laws from going into effect until bordering states pass similar regulations, is another step closer to finalizing labeling requirements. On Wednesday, the Vermont attorney general's office published its first draft of the rules for labeling food made with genetically modified organisms.

In nine pages, the draft covers the definitions of "food" and "genetic engineering," and what products will and will not be exempt under the law. The draft also covers some of the acceptable label disclosures and their meanings, such as "Produced with Genetic Engineering" or "Partially Produced with Genetic Engineering."

With the law intended to take effect in early 2016, Attorney General William Sorrell is striving to be prepared as early as possible. 

"We're on track to have this rule in a proposed final form by the end of this year or very, very early next year so that we have gotten it all done by sometime, hopefully, next spring," Sorrell told The Barre-Montpelier Times Argus. 

Some of the labeling details included in the draft deal with the location of the label on the package, font size and color requirements. However, these details are subject to review, and will also receive public input in two upcoming forums. 

With several other states exploring similar litigation, food producers and retailers need to take action to be prepared for the upcoming requirements. Violators of the GMO labeling bill will be subject to fines of $1,000 per day, according to the draft.

Investing in product label printing equipment from Durafast can help organizations avoid these hefty fines and be prepared for any other changes in legislation. 

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