Wine milkshakes get buzz out but could also pose problems

How do you use labels when you're a restaurant, or marketing products to a restaurant-style setting? When the customer isn't looking at the package directly and instead simply gets a glass or an item on a plate, important aspects of your product might not register with them.

Thus we get to the "wine shake," a concoction that is part of a marketing move by Red Robin to appeal to older female customers, according to USA Today. The drink seems to be about as simple as the name suggests: liquor plus ice cream blended together.

With such an eye-catching combination, the question becomes how to both successfully market it and make sure that minors are kept away from it. The restaurant seems to be using warnings and special sections of the menu to communicate what this drink really is to customers.

Infusing alcohol into other food items isn't a new practice and it shouldn't be surprising around booze-heavy holidays like St. Patrick's Day. An NPR cooking piece recently examined some of the different ways that this can be done. Since labels for food products often incorporate recipes, identifying alcohol content up front might be a helpful function your labels can thus fulfill. 

Other companies and retail stores might benefit from producing wine labels that have the same degree of warning and informative content but applied right onto the bottle, smoothly and without any creases or bumps.

To accomplish this, you can turn to printing solutions that  match whatever kind of container that your product is sold in. A maximum amount of festiveness and safety can be achieved if the color label printer system that you use is calibrated for the specific setting that you will be operating in.

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