How chemical labels can ease the transportation process

Pittsburgh's Channel 11 news station, WPXI, discovered that if a train carrying toxic chemicals were to derail in the area, some 700,000 people could be put at risk. Chemicals including sulfuric acid, refrigerated carbon dioxide and ferric chloride get hauled through the city every day by train through the Norfolk Southern Railway company. 

According to WPXI, the trains run past residential areas as well as the Convention Center, Federal Building and Consol Energy Center.

While Alvin Henderson of Allegheny County Emergency Management told the news source that his company has a strong, well-trained hazardous materials team, some residents were still nervous when they learned of what was being sent through their town. 

Norfolk Southern Railway released a statement, explaining that its workers are well-trained in transportation best practices and that it takes its responsibility to safety and security seriously.

"As a common carrier, Norfolk Southern is required by law to haul hazardous materials," the statement read. "We remain vigilant and committed to moving freight in a safe and secure manner, as well as building and maintaining partnerships with emergency responders in communities throughout our network."

Regardless of the material being moved from one site to the next, if dangerous items are involved, it is essential that all chemical labels are clear and accurate. Employees will know how to carry or move various containers when they know what is inside of it. Otherwise, improper storage, such as tilting a barrel the wrong way, could have disastrous consequences. 

Businesses that are involved in the production or distribution of hazardous chemicals are well-advised to invest in an Epson GP-C831 label printer. That way, all chemical labels that need to be printed will be durable and can adhere to federal standards.

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